Consuming Kids documentary.

 

View without children to proof the parts that you prefer to not have them see; some content may be beyond what you wish for them to know at the moment. While all content is reflective of much of our visual media, some presented here may require slightly older minds. 12 years and older should be able to watch most of the documentary; 10 years and younger about 80-90%, but use your discretion.

[This is a study of media's content - see Form and Content regarding the division of the study of media's form vs the study of media's content.]

Paul, being from Tarsus, a Hellenistic city, was educated in Greek culture and philosophy; some portions of his writings display his knowledge of Greek poets and Plato's writings in his use of that knowledge as cultural touchstones relatable to his audience. It is claimed, mostly by antagonists, that the Scriptures are simply an amalgam of appropriations and not the inspired word of God in respect to referentially Greek writings. However, Paul, edcuated in the art of rhetoric, used his understanding of philosophy and the cultural zeitgeist as rhetorical devices, appropriately using logos, pathos, and ethos to articulate the gospel, to elucidate and evaluate episteme [truth].

 

The Pauline encounters in Acts demonstrates Paul's conceptualization of prisoners bound to image worship. He notably divests the signs - the false idol imagery - of their connotations when he states that they are not gods, things made by hands, and refers to their denotative qualities: that they are made by hands, made with earthen materials. Did Paul know Connotation and Denotation? No, since that distinction is relatively recent, but he would have most likely known of Plato's Allegory of the Cave and the rhetorical division of Form and Content. Form and Content divides a claim, narrative, poem, visual image into two components similar to Connotation and Denotation.

 

The video above is a claymation animation of Plato's Allegory of the Cave, presented as insight to how Paul may have seen those he encountered, and to what Paul may have very well known. One should find in it, strong similarities with Scripture, notably passages in the Old Testament, passages relating to light and darkness, Christ Himself speaking in the synagogue stating that He has come to set liberty to the captives, and Paul's encounters in Acts. One should also find in it, similarities to our contemporary visual landscape: to be noted is the parallels between the shadows projected by light and the 20th and 21st century movie theater, and light projections of constructed narratives emitted from televisuals: televisions, the internet, social media photos, etc.

 

Plato's Cave is a study of both form and content: Form - the shadow projections are resemblances of information carried via light, is a model of the sun, and is decontextualization of information [decontextualization is the removal of context, thus the removal of information that may be necessary for deeper knowledge]; Content - ambiguity in language [information]; constructed by artifice through narrativistic means; allows for subjective interpretation

Epipheo TV highly summarizes Nicholas Carr's book, The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains.  This analysis from Carr involves an extension of Marshall McLuhan's research and writing, both of whom use the study of Form as a means for argument [see Form and Content regarding the division between the study of media's content versus the study of media's form.]

Nicholas Carr, author of The Shallows: What the Internet does to the Brain, provides a summary of his book, in 45 minutes. This analysis from Carr involves an extension of Marshall McLuhan's research and writing, both of whom use the study of Form as a means for argument [see Form and Content regarding the division between the study of media's content versus the study of media's form.]

Psychology and Advertising video

Effectiveness of prior knowledge is best when connotations and denotations are considered while viewing this video.

 

Quick definition recall:

Denotations: facts, figures, logic, the dictionary definition

Connotations: socio-cultural values, emotional appeals, character identification, use of color, etc.